Can Sinusitis be Helped with Cannabinoids?

Published by Jan

 

Sinusitis-


What is sinusitis?
Sinusitis is the inflammation of the paranasal symptoms leading to a congestion of the cavity with copious mucus secretion.  Almost all cases of sinusitis are due to an infection, either viral or bacterial, and less frequently due to fungi.  The most common causes of non-infectious sinusitis are allergies, and allergic sinusitis is similar to allergic rhinitis (hay fever) with the latter being isolated to the nasal cavity.  It is common for rhinitis, whether allergic or infectious, to precede and involve the sinuses. Overall sinusitis is a common condition affecting millions of people across the globe and in most instances it is chronic in nature.  It is one of the most common disorders seen by otolaryngologists and surgery for sinus wash-outs/drainage are a common procedure.


Acute and Chronic Causes


Acute sinusitis, like acute rhinitis, is often due to a viral infection.  It typically lasts about 2 weeks and is still considered as acute if it resolves within 30 days.  Subacute sinusitis tends to last longer and persist for 30 to 90 days. Chronic sinusitis is either persistent or recurrent.  It lasts longer than 90 days and recurrent cases are acute cases that tend to recur within 10 days. Chronic sinusitis is more often associated with recurrent bacterial infections, persistent fungal infections or allergic factors.  This is further complicated by anatomical defects like a deviated septum which does not allow for  adequate drainage of one or more sinuses.
Other factors that may cause or trigger sinusitis includes :
• Cigarette smoking
• Chronic acid reflux (gastroesophageal reflux disease)
• Environmental pollution
• Hormonal fluctuations – pregnancy, oral contraceptives.
• Cocaine use.
• Dental disorders.

Sinusitis is a common condition, with between 24—31 million cases occurring in the United States annually. Acute sinusitis (acute rhinosinusitis) causes the cavities around your nasal passages (sinuses) to become inflamed and swollen.  This interferes with drainage and causes mucus to build up.
With acute sinusitis, it may be difficult to breathe through your nose.  The area around your eyes and face may feel swollen, and you may have throbbing facial pain or a headache.  Acute sinusitis is most often caused by the common cold.  Other triggers include bacteria, allergies and fungal infections.  Treatment of acute sinusitis depends on the cause.  In most cases, home remedies  are all that is  needed. However, persistent sinusitis can lead to serious infections and other complications.  Sinusitis that lasts more than 12 weeks, or keeps coming back, is chronic sinusitis.

Chronic sinusitis is a common condition in which the cavities around nasal passages (sinuses) become inflamed and swollen.  Chronic sinusitis lasts three months or longer despite treatment attempts.  Also known as chronic rhinosinusitis, this condition interferes with drainage and causes mucus to build up.  If you have chronic sinusitis, it may be difficult to breathe through your nose.  The area around your eyes and face may feel swollen, and you may have throbbing facial pain or a headache.  Chronic sinusitis may be caused by an infection, but it can also be caused by growths in the sinuses (nasal polyps) or by a deviated nasal septum.  Chronic sinusitis most commonly affects young and middle-aged adults, but it also can affect children.


Signs and Symptoms

     

There are four pairs of paranasal sinuses and the symptoms of sinusitis may depend on which of these sinuses are affected.  A quick guide to the location of these sinuses is as follows :

  • • Frontal sinuses lie in the forehead above the eyes.
  • • Ethmoid sinuses lie on either side of the bridge of the nose next to the inner corner of the eyes.
  • • Sphenoid sinuses lies behind the nose and eyes.
  • • Maxillary sinuses lie in the cheek below the eyes.

The clinical features of sinusitis includes :
• Runny nose, often with pus.
• Nasal congestion.
• Nasal tone to the voice.
• Impaired sense of smell.
• Facial pain.
Sometimes there may be a cough and bad breath.  The more specific symptoms depending on the sinuses affected are as follows :
• Toothache and frontal headache (maxillary sinusitis)
• Eye pain and frontal headache (frontal sinusitis)
• Eye pain, swelling around eye and excessive tearing (ethmoidal sinusitis)
• Headache (front, top or back of head) and sometimes no runny nose or nasal congestion (sphenoidal sinusitis)

 

Treatment Options for Sinus Infections


Most short-term sinus infections can be treated medically. Even people with long-term or chronic sinus infections can find relief through medication.  But if none of these treatments works for you, sinus surgery may be the best way to ease your symptoms.
There are two types of sinus infections. Short-term or acute sinus infections appear and then clear up in a matter of days or weeks.  Long-term or chronic sinus infections continue for months or keep coming back.
Sinuses are air-filled spaces in the bones of the skull which open into the nose.


Treating Chronic Sinusitis

The goal for treatment of chronic sinusitis is to cure the infection and relieve the symptoms.  Many doctors still prescribe antibiotic sprays or oral antibiotics to treat the bacterial infection that has resulted from the inflammation.  Topical steroids such as nasal sprays are often recommended to treat chronic sinusitis related to allergies.  In some cases, surgery may be needed to clean and drain the sinuses.  These are  some of the common existing treatments.  What follows are some of the newest ways that medical professionals are finding to diagnose and treat chronic sinusitis.


Exciting New Research About The Causes And Treatment Of Chronic Sinusitis

It has assumed that chronic sinusitis is caused by a bacterial infection within the sinuses; thus, patients have been treated with antibiotics to fight the infection.  However, a recent study by the Mayo Clinic appears to refute the bacterial infection hypothesis.  In fact, the Mayo Clinic stated that "antibiotics don't help chronic sinusitis in the long run because they target bacteria, which are not usually the cause of chronic sinusitis."

So if a bacterial infection is not the root problem causing millions to suffer from chronic sinusitis, then what's to blame?  Fungus or mold (words used interchangeably), said the Mayo Clinic study.  While mold is a known allergen that many of you are likely sensitive to, this study shows that mold in the air and in the nose is directly linked to sinus inflammation.  Further research to support this discovery was just published by Dr. Donald Dennis who, between 1989 and 2003, studied 639 of his chronic sinusitis patients.  Using a variety of treatments, he found that those patients who were treated with a well-rounded protocol to eliminate fungus from their nose and environment saw significant results in their chronic sinusitis conditions.  In fact, the aforementioned Mayo Clinic study demonstrated that ninety three percent of all chronic sinusitis was caused by mold.
A more recent Mayo Clinic study proposes that exposure to airborne mold can even cause chronic rhinosinusitis (stuffy nose).  All of this new research has also changed the way some doctors go about treating patients with Chronic Sinusitis or Rhinosinusitis.  The exciting part is that since mold is an environmental problem, many of the steps suggested by Dr. Dennis and others are non-invasive, practical healthy-home solutions.

Control The Mold (Mould)

In accordance with the hypothesis that mold is the infection-causing culprit for much of our chronic sinusitis, the two most important factors to maintaining drainage in blocked sinuses are removing the mold in your sinuses and removing the mold in the air you breathe.  Dr. Dennis emphasizes that a patient must strictly follow the protocol to remove mold from the nose and environment to see results. 

Here is a brief overview of the sinus protocol used in the study.  To control the fungal load in his patients' noses, Dr. Dennis administered saline nasal irrigation with an irrigator, like the Hydro Pulse, which removes fungi mechanically.   He also had the study participants take antimicrobial nasal sprays.  The second major step in getting his chronic sinusitis sufferers to feel better was to remove the mold from their environment.  In fact, much of the treatment he uses is the same as what any allergy sufferer should do to avoid exposure to airborne mold particles.

The most important factor to remember is to locate and deal with the source of any incoming moisture. Dehumidification for controlling mold in your home.


Can Chronic Sinusitis Be Prevented?

You may not be a chronic sinusitis sufferer, but remember that the process by which it can start leaves many people susceptible to sinusitis.  Continued exposure to mold in your environment that lodges in your  nose can inhibit the draining of mucous in the nose.  Stagnant mucous can become infected and harbor bacteria, causing further infections.   It is important to note that a deviated septum or other obstruction of the nose may create pockets of fluid in the nose that can become infected.   Also, in some cases dental infections can spread into a sinus cavity and infect it directly.  However, if you fear that mold may be at the root of your sinus irritation, it is important to know what kind and how much mold may be in your environment.

Many doctors recommend taking an air sample for mold using specialized collecting plates.  Typically, such plates contain a substance such as agar, which allows mold to grow readily once collected.  A plate is placed in the bedroom, kitchen, living room and/or attic - or wherever mold is suspected.  The plates are to be exposed to normal air flow  for  one  hour, then wrapped in foil and sent to a lab for analysis.  If the lab analysis of your test plates shows airborne mold counts of more than four colonies then you should implement a mold-reduction regimen.  During Dr. Dennis' clinical trials, patients were instructed to maintain environments with mold counts below 4 colonies.   Those who maintained this level experienced dramatic improvement in their symptoms.

Some helpful tools for reducing mold counts in a room include using good morning Purifying Spray, which is odorless grapefruit seed extract - a natural enemy to mold.  In lab tests,CitriSafe, which uses cartridges of filter solution, reduced mold counts in a 200 square foot area to safe levels.  Two CitriSafe Refill Cartridges with wicks exposed on top of or within a HEPA room air cleaner.  This will ensure the solution is properly disseminated throughout the affected room.

Another helpful item for those concerned with airborne molds, germs and other bacteria is the Wein Personal Ionizer.  Tests show that it reduces the number of mold colonies to zero within its area of coverage.  The Wein Personal Ionizer is a convenient solution for anyone who wants clean air on the go - in airplanes or other transportation, city streets, department stores, hotels, movie theatres, etc.

In order to wash out the fungus and bacteria in the sinuses and maintain healthy mucous production, many doctors recommend saline sprays and washes, as well as nasal irrigators, like the Hydro Pulse.  Other irrigation options include the Nasaline Nasal Irrigator - a syringe style delivery system that offers portable, positive-pressure irrigation.  All of these irrigators use positive pressure to gently clean and moisturize the nasal cavities with saline solution and can provide relief  for chronic sinusitis.  The SinuCleanse is a durable, convenient irrigator modeled after the same neti-pots that have been used for centuries for nasal cleansing.

 


Can Sinusitis be Helped with Cannabinoids?

"A survivor of lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, endometriosis, interstitial cystitis, hypoglycemia, anemia, chronic sinusitis, chronic bacterial infections, and other serious ailments, Kristen Peskuski has come to believe that what she really suffered from was cannabinoid deficiency disorder--- and that drinking raw cannabis juice saved her live."

Do you suffer from chronic sinus attacks?  Medical marijuana has been proven to be beneficial in many disorders.  Now research has also shown that cannabinoids are also powerful and highly-effective antibiotics that could be the key to stopping antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as those found in chronic sinusitis.  Medical marijuana could help sufferers of sinusitis fight off infections that do not respond to antibiotics.
Researchers and drug makers are in the process of developing and testing antibiotic drugs made from cannabinoids to treat infections. They have been testing non-psychoactive compounds, like cannabichromene, cannabigerol, and cannabidiol, as well as the psychotropic tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), for their anti-bacterial properties.
Sinusitis is caused by infection and inflammation of the sinuses.  It can cause breathing difficulties, and make your life miserable.  Symptoms include a headache when you wake up in the morning, pain when the forehead is touched, heaviness in the head, coughing, sneezing, nasal congestion and a tired, achy feeling, that resembles a cold. However, cold treatments do not help sinusitis.  Until a cannabinoid drug is available to treat infections, sufferers could benefit from cautiously using natural cannabis to treat sinusitis.  
Cannabinoids have been shown to produce an anti-inflammatory effect.
Cannabinoids also have anti -microbial properties.

Cannabis vaporization limits respiratory toxins by heating cannabis to a temperature where cannabinoid vapors form (typically around 180-190 degrees Celsius),  but below the point of combustion where smoke
and associated toxins (e.g., carcinogenic hydrocarbons) are produced (near 230 degrees Celsius).  This eliminates the inhalation of any particulate matter and removes the health hazards of smoking.  In clinical trials, vaporization has shown to safely and effectively deliver pharmacologicallly active, aerosolized cannabinoids deeply into the lungs, where the rich vascular bed will rapidly deliver them to tissues.

How can one herb help so many different conditions?  How can it provide both palliative and curative actions?  How can it be so safe while offering such powerful effects?  The search to answer these questions has led scientists to the discovery of a previously unknown physiologic system, a central component of the health and
healing of every human and almost every animal:  the endocannabinoid system.
The endogenous cannabinoid system, named after the plant that led to its discovery, is perhaps the most important physiologic system involved in establishing and maintaining human health.  Endocannabinoids and their receptors are found throughout the body: in the brain, organs, connective tissues, glands, and immune cells.  In each tissue, the cannabinoid system performs different tasks, but the goal is always the same:  homeostasis, the maintenance of a stable internal environment despite fluctuations in the external environment.  Cannabinoids promote homeostasis.  Endocannabinoids and cannabinoids are also found at the intersection of the body's various systems, allowing communication and coordination between different cell types.  At the site of an injury, for example, cannabinoids can be found decreasing the release of activators and sensitizers from the injured tissue, stabilizing the nerve cell to prevent excessive firing, and calming nearby immune cells to prevent release of pro-inflammatory substances.  Three different mechanisms of action on three different cell types for a single purpose:  minimize the pain and damage caused by the injury or disease.

The endocannabinoid system, with its complex actions in our immune system, nervous system, and all of the body's organs, is literally a bridge between body and mind.  By understanding this system  we begin to see a mechanism that explains how states of consciousness can promote health or disease.

In addition to regulating our internal and cellular homeostasis, cannabinoids influence a person's relationship with the external environment.  Socially, the administration of cannabinoids clearly alters human behavior, often promoting sharing, humor, and creativity.  By mediating neurogenesis, neuronal plasticity, and learning, cannabinoids may directly influence a person's open-mindedness and ability to move beyond limiting patterns of thought and behavior from past situations.  Reformatting these old patterns is an essential part of health in our quickly changing environment.


Small, regular doses of marijuana might act as a tonic to our most central physiologic healing system.


Unlike synthetic derivatives, herbal marijuana may contain over one hundred different cannabinoids, including THC, which all work synergistically to produce better medical effects and less side effects than THC alone.

Sinusitis is an inflammation of nasal passages which causes pain and pressure around forehead, eyes ad cheeks.  If proper prevention is taken, sinuses can be cured easily which will gradually minimize the sinus attacks.

 

 Recommendation:  Whole plant extracts-oils, tinctures, edibles, cannabutter, concoctions, and vaporizer

Indica dominant hybrid (higher CBD levels)

 

 

 


References__________________________________________
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 Sinusitis-
What is sinusitis?
Sinusitis is the inflammation of the paranasal symptoms leading to a congestion of the cavity with copious mucus secretion.  Almost all cases of sinusitis are due to an infection, either viral or bacterial, and less frequently due to fungi.  The most common causes of non-infectious sinusitis is allergies, and allergic sinusitis is similar to allergic rhinitis (hay fever) with the latter being isolated to the nasal cavity.  It is common for rhinitis, whether allergic or infectious, to precede and involve the sinuses. Overall sinusitis is a common condition affecting millions of people across the globe and in most instances it is chronic in nature.  It is one of the most common disorders seen by otolaryngologists and surgery for sinus wash-outs/drainage are a common procedure.
Acute and Chronic Causes
Acute sinusitis, like acute rhinitis, is often due to a viral infection.  It typically lasts about 2 weeks and is still considered as acute if it resolves within 30 days.  Subacute sinusitis tends to last longer and persist for 30 to 90 days. Chronic sinusitis is either persistent or recurrent.  It lasts longer than 90 days and recurrent cases are acute cases that tend to recur within 10 days. Chronic sinusitis is more often associated with recurrent bacterial infections, persistent fungal infections or allergic factors.  This is further complicated by anatomical defects like a deviated septum which does not allow for  adequate drainage of one or more sinuses.
Other factors that may cause or trigger sinusitis includes :
• Cigarette smoking
• Chronic acid reflux (gastroesophageal reflux disease)
• Environmental pollution
• Hormonal fluctuations – pregnancy, oral contraceptives.
• Cocaine use.
• Dental disorders.

Sinusitis is a common condition, with between 24—31 million cases occurring in the United States annually.
Acute sinusitis (acute rhinosinusitis) causes the cavities around your nasal passages (sinuses) to become inflamed and swollen.  This interferes with drainage and causes mucus to build up.
With acute sinusitis, it may be difficult to breathe through your nose.  The area around your eyes and face may feel swollen, and you may have throbbing facial pain or a headache.
Acute sinusitis is most often caused by the common cold.  Other triggers include bacteria, allergies and fungal infections.  Treatment of acute sinusitis depends on the cause.  In most cases, home remedies  are all that is  needed. However, persistent sinusitis can lead to serious infections and other complications.  Sinusitis that lasts more than 12 weeks, or keeps coming back, is chronic sinusitis.

Chronic sinusitis is a common condition in which the cavities around nasal passages (sinuses) become inflamed and swollen.  Chronic sinusitis lasts three months or longer despite treatment attempts.
Also known as chronic rhinosinusitis, this condition interferes with drainage and causes mucus to build up.  If you have chronic sinusitis, it may be difficult to breathe through your nose.  The area around your eyes and face may feel swollen, and you may have throbbing facial pain or a headache.
Chronic sinusitis may be caused by an infection, but it can also be caused by growths in the sinuses (nasal polyps) or by a deviated nasal septum.  Chronic sinusitis most commonly affects young and middle-aged adults, but it also can affect children.


Signs and Symptoms

 

 

 

There are four pairs of paranasal sinuses and the symptoms of sinusitis may depend on which of these sinuses are affected.  A quick guide to the location of these sinuses is as follows :
• Frontal sinuses lie in the forehead above the eyes.
• Ethmoid sinuses lie on either side of the bridge of the nose next to the inner corner of the eyes.
• Sphenoid sinuses lies behind the nose and eyes.
• Maxillary sinuses lie in the cheek below the eyes.

The clinical features of sinusitis includes :
• Runny nose, often with pus.
• Nasal congestion.
• Nasal tone to the voice.
• Impaired sense of smell.
• Facial pain.
Sometimes there may be a cough and bad breath.  The more specific symptoms depending on the sinuses affected are as follows :
• Toothache and frontal headache (maxillary sinusitis)
• Eye pain and frontal headache (frontal sinusitis)
• Eye pain, swelling around eye and excessive tearing (ethmoidal sinusitis)
• Headache (front, top or back of head) and sometimes no runny nose or nasal congestion (sphenoidal sinusitis)

Treatment Options for Sinus Infections


Most short-term sinus infections can be treated medically. Even people with long-term or chronic sinus infections can find relief through medication.  But if none of these treatments works for you, sinus surgery may be the best way to ease your symptoms.
There are two types of sinus infections. Short-term or acute sinus infections appear and then clear up in a matter of days or weeks.  Long-term or chronic sinus infections continue for months or keep coming back.
Sinuses are air-filled spaces in the bones of the skull which open into the nose.
Treating Chronic Sinusitis

The goal for treatment of chronic sinusitis is to cure the infection and relieve the symptoms.  Many doctors still prescribe antibiotic sprays or oral antibiotics to treat the bacterial infection that has resulted from the inflammation.  Topical steroids such as nasal sprays are often recommended to treat chronic sinusitis related to allergies.  In some cases, surgery may be needed to clean and drain the sinuses.  These are  some of the common existing treatments.  What follows are some of the newest ways that medical professionals are finding to diagnose and treat chronic sinusitis.


Exciting New Research About The Causes And Treatment Of Chronic Sinusitis

It has assumed that chronic sinusitis is caused by a bacterial infection within the sinuses; thus, patients have been treated with antibiotics to fight the infection.  However, a recent study by the Mayo Clinic appears to refute the bacterial infection hypothesis.  In fact, the Mayo Clinic stated that "antibiotics don't help chronic sinusitis in the long run because they target bacteria, which are not usually the cause of chronic sinusitis."

So if a bacterial infection is not the root problem causing millions to suffer from chronic sinusitis, then what's to blame?  Fungus or mold (words used interchangeably), said the Mayo Clinic study.  While mold is a known allergen that many of you are likely sensitive to, this study shows that mold in the air and in the nose is directly linked to sinus inflammation.  Further research to support this discovery was just published by Dr. Donald Dennis who, between 1989 and 2003, studied 639 of his chronic sinusitis patients.  Using a variety of treatments, he found that those patients who were treated with a well-rounded protocol to eliminate fungus from their nose and environment saw significant results in their chronic sinusitis conditions.  In fact, the aforementioned Mayo Clinic study demonstrated that ninety three percent of all chronic sinusitis was caused by mold.
A more recent Mayo Clinic study proposes that exposure to airborne mold can even cause chronic rhinosinusitis (stuffy nose).  All of this new research has also changed the way some doctors go about treating patients with Chronic Sinusitis or Rhinosinusitis.  The exciting part is that since mold is an environmental problem, many of the steps suggested by Dr. Dennis and others are non-invasive, practical healthy-home solutions.

Control The Mold!

In accordance with the hypothesis that mold is the infection-causing culprit for much of our chronic sinusitis, the two most important factors to maintaining drainage in blocked sinuses are removing the mold in your sinuses and removing the mold in the air you breathe.  Dr. Dennis emphasizes that a patient must strictly follow the protocol to remove mold from the nose and environment to see results. 

Here is a brief overview of the sinus protocol used in the study.  To control the fungal load in his patients' noses, Dr. Dennis administered saline nasal irrigation with an irrigator, like the Hydro Pulse, which removes fungi mechanically.   He also had the study participants take antimicrobial nasal sprays.  The second major step in getting his chronic sinusitis sufferers to feel better was to remove the mold from their environment.  In fact, much of the treatment he uses is the same as what any allergy sufferer should do to avoid exposure to airborne mold particles.

The most important factor to remember is to locate and deal with the source of any incoming moisture. Dehumidification for controlling mold in your home.


Can Chronic Sinusitis Be Prevented?

You may not be a chronic sinusitis sufferer, but remember that the process by which it can start leaves many people susceptible to sinusitis.  Continued exposure to mold in your environment that lodges in your 
nose can inhibit the draining of mucous in the nose.  Stagnant mucous can become infected and harbor bacteria, causing further infections.   It is important to note that a deviated septum or other obstruction of the nose may create pockets of fluid in the nose that can become infected.   Also, in some cases dental infections can spread into a sinus cavity and infect it directly.  However, if you fear that mold may be at the root of your sinus irritation, it is important to know what kind and how much mold may be in your environment.

Many doctors recommend taking an air sample for mold using specialized collecting plates.  Typically, such plates contain a substance such as agar, which allows mold to grow readily once collected.  A plate is placed in the bedroom, kitchen, living room and/or attic - or wherever mold is suspected.  The plates are to be exposed to normal air flow  for  one  hour, then wrapped in foil and sent to a lab for analysis.  If the lab analysis of your test plates shows airborne mold counts of more than four colonies then you should implement a mold-reduction regimen.  During Dr. Dennis' clinical trials, patients were instructed to maintain environments with mold counts below 4 colonies.   Those who maintained this level experienced dramatic improvement in their symptoms.

Some helpful tools for reducing mold counts in a room include using good morning Purifying Spray, which is odorless grapefruit seed extract - a natural enemy to mold.  In lab tests,CitriSafe, which uses cartridges of filter solution, reduced mold counts in a 200 square foot area to safe levels.  Two CitriSafe Refill Cartridges with wicks exposed on top of or within a HEPA room air cleaner.  This will ensure the solution is properly disseminated throughout the affected room.

Another helpful item for those concerned with airborne molds, germs and other bacteria is the Wein Personal Ionizer.  Tests show that it reduces the number of mold colonies to zero within its area of coverage.  The Wein Personal Ionizer is a convenient solution for anyone who wants clean air on the go - in airplanes or other transportation, city streets, department stores, hotels, movie theatres, etc.

In order to wash out the fungus and bacteria in the sinuses and maintain healthy mucous production, many doctors recommend saline sprays and washes, as well as nasal irrigators, like the Hydro Pulse.  Other irrigation options include the Nasaline Nasal Irrigator - a syringe style delivery system that offers portable, positive-pressure irrigation.  All of these irrigators use positive pressure to gently clean and moisturize the nasal cavities with saline solution and can provide relief  for chronic sinusitis.  The SinuCleanse is a durable, convenient irrigator modeled after the same neti-pots that have been used for centuries for nasal cleansing.


Can Sinusitis be Helped with Cannabinoids?

"A survivor of lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, endometriosis, interstitial cystitis, hypoglycemia, anemia, chronic sinusitis, chronic bacterial infections, and other serious ailments, Kristen Peskuski has come to believe that what she really suffered from was cannabinoid deficiency disorder--- and that drinking raw cannabis juice saved her live."


Do you suffer from chronic sinus attacks?  Medical marijuana has been proven to be beneficial in many disorders.  Now research has also shown that cannabinoids are also powerful and highly-effective antibiotics that could be the key to stopping antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as those found in chronic sinusitis.  Medical marijuana could help sufferers of sinusitis fight off infections that do not respond to antibiotics.
Researchers and drug makers are in the process of developing and testing antibiotic drugs made from cannabinoids to treat infections. They have been testing non-psychoactive compounds, like cannabichromene, cannabigerol, and cannabidiol, as well as the psychotropic tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), for their anti-bacterial properties.
Sinusitis is caused by infection and inflammation of the sinuses.  It can cause breathing difficulties, and make your life miserable.  Symptoms include a headache when you wake up in the morning, pain when the forehead is touched, heaviness in the head, coughing, sneezing, nasal congestion and a tired, achy feeling, that resembles a cold. However, cold treatments do not help sinusitis.  Until a cannabinoid drug is available to treat infections, sufferers could benefit from cautiously using natural cannabis to treat sinusitis.  
Cannabinoids have been shown to produce an anti-inflammatory effect.
Cannabinoids also have anti infection properties.

Cannabis vaporization limits respiratory toxins by heating cannabis to a temperature where cannabinoid vapors form (typically around 180-190 degrees Celsius),  but below the point of combustion where smoke
and associated toxins (e.g., carcinogenic hydrocarbons) are produced
(near 230 degrees Celsius).  This eliminates the inhalation of any parti-
culate matter and removes the health hazards of smoking.  In clinical trials, vaporization has shown to safely and effectively deliver parma-
cologicallly active, aerosolized cannabinoids deeply into the lungs, where the rich vascular bed will rapidly deliver them to tissues.

How can one herb help so many different conditions?  How can it provide both palliative and curative actions?  How can it be so safe
while offering such powerful effects?  The search to answer
these questions has led scientists to the discovery of a previously unknown physiologic system, a central component of the health and
healing of every human and almost every animal:  the endocannabinoid system.
The endogenous cannabinoid system, named after the plant that led to its discovery, is perhaps the most important physiologic system in-
volved in establishing and maintaining human health.  Endocannabinoids and their receptors are found throughout the body: in the brain, organs, connective tissues, glands, and immune cells.  In each tissue, the cannabinoid system performs different tasks, but the goal is always the same:  homeostasis, the maintenance of a stable internal environment despite fluctuations in the external environment.
Cannabinoids promote homeostasis.

Endocannabinoids and cannabinoids are also found at the intersection 
of the body's various systems, allowing communication and coordination between different cell types.  At the site of an
injury, for example, cannabinoids can be found decreasing the release of activators and sensitizers from the injured tissue, stabilizing the nerve cell to prevent excessive firing, and calming nearby
immune cells to prevent release of pro-inflammatory substances.  Three different mechanisms of action on three different cell types
for a single purpose:  minimize the pain and damage caused by the injury or illness.

The endocannabinoid system, with its complex actions in our immune system, nervous system, and all of the body's organs, is literally a bridge between body and mind.  By understanding this system
we begin to see a mechanism that explains how states of consciousness can promote health or disease.

In addition to regulating our internal and cellular homeostasis, cannabinoids influence a person's relationship with the external environment.  Socially, the administration of cannabinoids clearly
alters human behavior, often promoting sharing, humor, and creativity.  By mediating neurogenesis, neuronal plasticity, and learning, cannabinoids may directly influence a person's open-mindedness and ability to move beyond limiting patterns of thought and behavior from past situations.  Reformatting these old patterns is an essential part of health in our quickly changing environment.


Small, regular doses of marijuana might act as a tonic to our most central physiologic healing system.
Unlike synthetic derivatives, herbal marijuana may contain over one hundred different cannabinoids, including THC, which all work synergistically to produce better medical effects and less side effects than THC alone.

Sinus is an inflammation of nasal passages which causes snarling and pressure around forehead, eyes and cheeks.  If proper prevention is taken, sinuses  can be cured easily which will gradually minimize the sinus attacks.

 

 


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